Bank $Security

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Banks. They take your money and lend it to others. They lend money deposited by other people to you, either as a car loan, mortgage, or for credit card purchases. For this privilege, you give them all of your personal information, including your social security number. Implicit in that exchange is the fact that the bank should keep your personal information confidential. Security is important. One might think that such a concept would be important to banks. One would be wrong.

To be fair, the high ranking people at the banks probably believe that all of their customer information should be - and is - secure and protected. Unfortunately, there are multiple layers of middle and lower management (that we all know all too well) that might not comprehend that point.

A Passion for Details

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Passion projects are so common in our industry that there are some people who won’t hire you as a programmer if you’re not also programming in your free time. That’s TRWTF, honestly. There’s nothing wrong with being the kind of programmer who shows up for your 9–5 and then goes home and doesn’t touch a computer until the next day.

There’s also nothing wrong with passion projects. I have a bunch of them, usually carefully chosen to have absolutely no utility whatsoever, so they never start feeling like a job.

Drunken Parsing

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"Hi, $(lookup(BOOZE_SHOP_OF_LEAST_MISTRUST))$ Have you been drinking while parsing your variables?" Tom G. writes.

Flushed Down the Pipe

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No matter how much I personally like functional programming, I know that it is not a one-size fits all solution for every problem.

Vald M knows this too. Which is why they sent us an email that simply said: “We have a functional programmer on the team”, with this representative line attached.

Lightweight Date Handling

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Darlene has a co-worker who discovered a problem: they didn’t know or understand any of the C++ libraries for manipulating dates and times. Checking the documentation or googling it is way too much to ask, so instead they opted to use the tools they already understood- a database. We’ve seen that before.

There was just one other problem: this application wasn’t data-driven, and thus didn’t have a database to query.

And Now You Have Two Problems

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We all know the old saying: “Some people, when confronted with a problem, think ‘I know, I’ll use regular expressions.’ Now they have two problems.” The quote has a long and storied history, but Roger A’s co-worker decided to take it quite literally.

Specifically, they wanted to be able to build validation rules which could apply a regular expression to the input. Thus, they wrote the RegExpConstraint class:

Daylight Losing Time

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The second Sunday of March has come to pass, which means if you're a North American reader, you're getting this an hour earlier than normal. What a bonus! That's right, we all got to experience the mandatory clock-changing event known as Daylight Saving Time. While the sun, farm animals, toddlers, etc. don't care about an arbitrary changing of the clock, computers definitely do.

Early in my QA career, I had the great (dis)pleasure of fully regression testing electronic punch clocks on every possible software version every time a DST change was looming. It was every bit as miserable as it sounds but was necessary because if punches were an hour off for thousands of employees, it would wreak havoc on our clients' payroll processing.

ICANN't Even...

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Jeff W. writes, "You know, I don't think this one will pass."